Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology
Mobile learning for differentiated school leadership development
Tarek Shal 1, Norma Ghamrawi 1 * , Najah Ghamrawi 1
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1 Faculty of Education, Lebanese University, Lebanon
* Corresponding Author
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Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 2019 - Volume 1 Issue 2, pp. 88-103

Article Type: Research Article

Published Online: 17 Dec 2019

Views: 121 | Downloads: 96

ABSTRACT
Drawing upon empirical data, this article explores the potentials of an optimized social media tool in supporting differentiated leadership development of school principals. This is a case study that involved 48 school principals: 24 from public schools and 24 from private schools; following surveying of 649 principals from both sectors in Lebanon. The study was addressed using qualitative telephone interviewing which followed the participation of a purposeful sample in using a Mobile Application named SkooLead developed by the researcher. SkooLead aimed at responding and catering for all the obstacles cited by school principals as hindering them from using Web 2.0 for personalized learning. As such, SkooLead offered a presumably optimized medium for personalized differentiated leadership development by school principals. Data was treated using theme-based analysis. The case study offered promising findings as to the potential of such tools, under optimum conditions, in nourishing differentiated leadership development by school principals.
KEYWORDS
In-text citation: (Shal et al., 2019)
Reference: Shal, T., Ghamrawi, N., & Ghamrawi, N. (2019). Mobile learning for differentiated school leadership development. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 1(2), 88-103.
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Shal T, Ghamrawi N, Ghamrawi N. Mobile learning for differentiated school leadership development. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology. 2019;1(2), 88-103.
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Shal T, Ghamrawi N, Ghamrawi N. Mobile learning for differentiated school leadership development. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology. 2019;1(2):88-103.
In-text citation: (Shal et al., 2019)
Reference: Shal, Tarek, Norma Ghamrawi, and Najah Ghamrawi. "Mobile learning for differentiated school leadership development". Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology 2019 1 no. 2 (2019): 88-103.
In-text citation: (Shal et al., 2019)
Reference: Shal, T., Ghamrawi, N., and Ghamrawi, N. (2019). Mobile learning for differentiated school leadership development. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 1(2), pp. 88-103.
In-text citation: (Shal et al., 2019)
Reference: Shal, Tarek et al. "Mobile learning for differentiated school leadership development". Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, vol. 1, no. 2, 2019, pp. 88-103.
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