Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology
Interaction of initiating prompts and the patterns of student engagement in higher education biology classrooms
Hlologelo C. Khoza 1 * , Thato I. Makgata 1
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1 University of Pretoria, South Africa
* Corresponding Author
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Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 2024 - Volume 6 Issue 2, pp. 64-77
https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202426566

Article Type: Research Article

Published Online: 23 Apr 2024

Views: 470 | Downloads: 219

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to understand the interactions of prompts used to initiate engagement and the resulting student engagement using video-data from one biology lecturer in a semester-long module. This study was informed by the socio-cultural perspectives on learning. The transcripts from video data were divided into interactive episodes. In these episodes, we looked for how the prompts (classified as verbal and non-verbal) interacted to bring student engagement. Findings indicate that the prompts interacted in a variety of ways. Findings indicate that the use of verbal prompts like questions resulted in minimal student engagement. Student engagement was heightened when the lecturer initiated whole-class discussion using both verbal prompts as well as non-verbal prompts in an interactive manner. We discuss the significance of these findings and argue how our approach to looking at student engagement helped us to unpack these succinct findings.
KEYWORDS
In-text citation: (Khoza & Makgata, 2024)
Reference: Khoza, H. C., & Makgata, T. I. (2024). Interaction of initiating prompts and the patterns of student engagement in higher education biology classrooms. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 6(2), 64-77. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202426566
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Khoza HC, Makgata TI. Interaction of initiating prompts and the patterns of student engagement in higher education biology classrooms. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology. 2024;6(2), 64-77. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202426566
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Khoza HC, Makgata TI. Interaction of initiating prompts and the patterns of student engagement in higher education biology classrooms. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology. 2024;6(2):64-77. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202426566
In-text citation: (Khoza and Makgata, 2024)
Reference: Khoza, Hlologelo C., and Thato I. Makgata. "Interaction of initiating prompts and the patterns of student engagement in higher education biology classrooms". Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology 2024 6 no. 2 (2024): 64-77. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202426566
In-text citation: (Khoza and Makgata, 2024)
Reference: Khoza, H. C., and Makgata, T. I. (2024). Interaction of initiating prompts and the patterns of student engagement in higher education biology classrooms. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 6(2), pp. 64-77. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202426566
In-text citation: (Khoza and Makgata, 2024)
Reference: Khoza, Hlologelo C. et al. "Interaction of initiating prompts and the patterns of student engagement in higher education biology classrooms". Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, vol. 6, no. 2, 2024, pp. 64-77. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202426566
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