Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology
The ‘blemishes’ of COVID-19 at South Africa’s higher education institutions
Sammy D. Khoza 1 *
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1 Tshwane University of Technology, Soshanguve North Campus, Pretoria, South Africa
* Corresponding Author
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Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 2023 - Volume 5 Issue 2, pp. 62-70
https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202322806

Article Type: Research Article

Published Online: 26 Aug 2023

Views: 336 | Downloads: 196

ABSTRACT
This qualitative study presents the blemishes of COVID-19 at Higher Education institutions. The aim of the study was to see if online learning and teaching are continuing in Higher Education institutions post-COVID-19. A sample of twenty participants comprising ten students and ten lecturers were purposively selected to take part in the study. Data was collected using an e-questionnaire which was emailed to the participants. The findings of the study revealed that students are keen on continuing with online learning because of the flexibility that it has. On the other hand, lecturers remain stuck in the old ways of teaching because of the non-compatibility of gadgets and the persisting load shedding that grapples the country. The study recommends that the lecturers need to be provided with tools to teach online to remain to be in line with the world’s move towards the integration of technology. The issue of load shedding needs to be addressed in the country needs to realise the benefits of the fourth industrial revolution.
KEYWORDS
In-text citation: (Khoza, 2023)
Reference: Khoza, S. D. (2023). The ‘blemishes’ of COVID-19 at South Africa’s higher education institutions. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 5(2), 62-70. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202322806
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Khoza SD. The ‘blemishes’ of COVID-19 at South Africa’s higher education institutions. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology. 2023;5(2), 62-70. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202322806
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Khoza SD. The ‘blemishes’ of COVID-19 at South Africa’s higher education institutions. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology. 2023;5(2):62-70. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202322806
In-text citation: (Khoza, 2023)
Reference: Khoza, Sammy D.. "The ‘blemishes’ of COVID-19 at South Africa’s higher education institutions". Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology 2023 5 no. 2 (2023): 62-70. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202322806
In-text citation: (Khoza, 2023)
Reference: Khoza, S. D. (2023). The ‘blemishes’ of COVID-19 at South Africa’s higher education institutions. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 5(2), pp. 62-70. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202322806
In-text citation: (Khoza, 2023)
Reference: Khoza, Sammy D. "The ‘blemishes’ of COVID-19 at South Africa’s higher education institutions". Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, vol. 5, no. 2, 2023, pp. 62-70. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202322806
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