Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology
Macro inquiries on needs-based language learning and its implications on ESP syllabus design
Jabbar Al Muzzamil Fareen 1 *
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1 PDPM Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design & Manufacturing Jabalpur, India
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Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 2024 - Volume 6 Issue 1, pp. 1-11
https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202424177

Article Type: Research Article

Published Online: 27 Nov 2023

Views: 208 | Downloads: 112

ABSTRACT
The specification of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) courses to develop target level communicative competence has been the dire needs of any professional and technical education programmes today. As ESP courses need to be redesigned to the changing requirements of academics and industry, this paper attempts to propose a framework that could satisfy the objectives of learners and their specific purpose of learning. In this paper, the macro inquiries of why, what, and how of the specific purpose of language learning is discussed to plan the aim, objectives, and goals of a needs-based course. As contextual analysis is very much perpetual for designing an ESP course, this paper envisages the importance of conducting needs and demands analysis to understand and articulate the present and the target situation needs of the learner. With this pursuit, a theoretical and practical framework for designing a learner and learning needs-based ESP syllabus has been advocated with the specifications of integrated, interrelated, and interdependent components of product and process design.
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In-text citation: (Fareen, 2024)
Reference: Fareen, J. A. M. (2024). Macro inquiries on needs-based language learning and its implications on ESP syllabus design. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 6(1), 1-11. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202424177
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Fareen JAM. Macro inquiries on needs-based language learning and its implications on ESP syllabus design. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology. 2024;6(1), 1-11. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202424177
In-text citation: (1), (2), (3), etc.
Reference: Fareen JAM. Macro inquiries on needs-based language learning and its implications on ESP syllabus design. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology. 2024;6(1):1-11. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202424177
In-text citation: (Fareen, 2024)
Reference: Fareen, Jabbar Al Muzzamil. "Macro inquiries on needs-based language learning and its implications on ESP syllabus design". Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology 2024 6 no. 1 (2024): 1-11. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202424177
In-text citation: (Fareen, 2024)
Reference: Fareen, J. A. M. (2024). Macro inquiries on needs-based language learning and its implications on ESP syllabus design. Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, 6(1), pp. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202424177
In-text citation: (Fareen, 2024)
Reference: Fareen, Jabbar Al Muzzamil "Macro inquiries on needs-based language learning and its implications on ESP syllabus design". Journal of Pedagogical Sociology and Psychology, vol. 6, no. 1, 2024, pp. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.33902/jpsp.202424177
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